From the category archives:

Yahoo

Guest Post by Liza Hausman Vice President of Marketing, Gigya

In 1999 “Permission Marketing” was the buzzword of the year when Seth Godin wrote a book about “turning strangers into friends and friends into customers.” As Godin told marketers, “By talking only to volunteers, Permission Marketing guarantees that consumers pay more attention to the marketing message. It serves both customers and marketers in a symbiotic exchange.”

 

Today, technologies like Facebook Connect and Twitter for Websites are helping to create a new concept of permission marketing. Using these technologies on their own sites, businesses are able to establish a permission-based relationship with their users and customers that complements their efforts on Facebook, Twitter or other social sites.

 

The Huffington Post is the poster child for this new social-data-based permission marketing approach. Readers raise their hands by using their existing Facebook, Twitter or other social identity to register, giving HuffPo access to data with which the site can socialize the user experience. Readers can see what their friends are reading and sharing on their site, giving them a powerful social filter for relevant content. It also means The Huffington Post can sell advertising on their own site based on everything they know about the user from a social perspective.

 

 

 

 

The Huffington Post’s application of Facebook Connect and similar technologies to create a social news experience has been the key driver of its phenomenal traffic growth over the past year plus. Social advertising is also a key source of its revenue growth.

 

But it is the layers on top of the Social Sign-on foundation that are the most promising for the future of advertising. In addition to basic demographic targeting, sites could offer advertising based on interest data, targeting fans of True Blood or Android.  Sites could also sell against social influence and activity — factors such as the number of friends, their propensity to share and their history of driving new visitors to the site, or even the number of items “Liked” as an indicator of engagement.  Reward programs driven by game mechanics are a key part of the nurturing process in this new model, where a loyal, engaged and most importantly non-anonymous audience is the new currency of marketing.

 

Challenges do remain, but a permission-based approach will be a competitive imperative, and those that are able to embrace and experiment with its possibilities will be able to more effectively increase customer value, command higher CPMs and ensure their social efforts deliver real ROI.

 

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If search is any indication of what people want, they want Facebook more than twice as much as Google and Yahoo according to Google Trends.

I also compared the most popular social media companies to Facebook on Google Trends, to see if perhaps social media properties skew higher than the old Internet titans.  They don’t.

I was curious how Google compared to the old titans, and interesting, Yahoo and Google are neck and neck.

To be fair, these results are based on Google search results, so I’m not quite sure why someone would go to Google to search the keyword term “Google”, but it was fun to pulling the data.

To learn more about how Google Trends are calculated, click here.

Jay Gould maintains a long position in shares of Facebook (private).

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In this clip from CNBC, Lou Kerner, partner at SecondShares and social media analyst at Wedbush Securities, discusses how Yahoo is a company in transition, and the company’s strained relationship with the Alibaba Group.

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